Monday Memories – Fireman at 65 Kimberley Street, West Leederville (29/08/2016)

Monday Memories@Cambridge Library this week, takes us back to 65 Kimberley Street, West Leederville and the second home of the Leederville Fire Brigade. It is around 1914, and let’s face it who doesn’t appreciate a fireman, no matter the era.

This photo was believed to be taken after the brigade had received their ‘new’ fire engine that was retired from service in England. Louis Shapcott, who took this photograph was a Member of Parliament and a keen photographer who lived in Kimberley Street, around the corner from the station.

‘Holman’ as it appears scrolled on the front of the engine, was a puzzle until I spoke with Andrew Duckworth a fireman who has recently published a book called Suburban Bravery – The Firemen of North Perth 1902 – 1926. Andrew kindly did some research for me:

“I reply to your question why was HOLMAN on the front of the appliance.

John Barkell Holman was heavily involved volunteer fireman at the turn of the century and was the first Life Member of the Volunteer Association.

Very involved with unionism in Western Australia.

Was a member of Parliament for many years, Police Minister amongst his many jobs.

Great friend of the Premier, J Scaddan.

I think he also served on the WAFB Board.

His daughter became the first female member of Parliament of Western Australia  (Holman House in Wellington St Perth).

His sons joined fire brigade, one J B Holman joined in 1917 only staying for a short period due to injuries, his second son W T (Bill) Holman joined in 1933 and retired I think in or around 1965. I worked with him at Claremont.

John Barkell Holman Snr died in 1925 whilst a Minister of W A Parliament.   His daughter May then took his seat.

I can only assume that the fire appliance was named after him as a mark of respect.  Given the close ties to the W A Fire Brigade, The Minister (Scaddan) and his daughter.

Leederville closed in 1925/ 1926 then North Perth.

The naming of fire appliances is not unique, the first being on the 1st motorized pump in the WAFBB, the Lady Edeline after the Governor’s wife. Later the Lapsley ambulance, Mourray on the front of the South Perth Commer pump.

Some pumpers during the 1920s and 1930s had small crests mounted on the nearside on the near the motor bonnet.”

 

Ph0102-06 Shapcott -Side view of fire engine with uniformed firemen outside Leederville Fire Station 65 Kimberley St, circa 1914 for e

Above: Ph0102-06 Side view of fire engine with uniformed firemen posed outside the Leederville Fire Station 65 Kimberley Street, circa 1914, Louis Shapcott (Courtesy the State Library of Western Australia BA1104/21 – 000481D)

Ph0102-20  65 Kimberley Street, circa 1914

Above: Ph0102-20  65 Kimberley Street, circa 1914, by Louis Shaocott (Courtesy the State Library of Western Australia BA1104/23 – 000483D)

 

If you would like to find out more about Andrew’s book Suburban Bravery – The Firemen of North Perth 1902 – 1926, you can get in touch with him via Facebook www.facebook.com/suburbanbravery or his website www.suburbanbravery.com for more details.

Suburban Bravery cover

 

Colouring the Past

Colour photography was not something widely available until the 1960s so it is not surprising that when looking at the black and white images of times past you start to imagine the colours that might have been. It was this thought as well as the popularity of colouring in for adults that inspired the recent Colouring the Past display at the Library for the National Trust’s WA Heritage Festival.

Colouring The Past - Ph0107-02Colouring The Past - Ph0102-20

Now you can take a stroll back through time and discover some of the moments as you Colour in the Past by downloading and printing out the colouring sheets from our display right here on our blog: Colouring The Past – Adding colour to historic images of Cambridge in times gone by

If you enjoy these you might also like to check out the Town of Cambridge’s Historypin Profile, where images are being added regularly: https://www.historypin.org/en/person/44884

Cambridge Library celebrates the National Trust’s Western Australian Heritage Festival

From Saturday, April 16 until Wednesday, May 18, Western Australians are invited to celebrate the history of our beautiful state during the National Trust’s Western Australian Heritage Festival. Check out all the state’s events on the Festival website: http://www.nationaltrustfestival.org.au/events/#state=WA

Cambridge Library is hosting three events this year and you are invited to walk back in time, to colour the past and to explore the Western Australian Convict Phenomenon..

Time Trails - portrait

 

WA Convict Phenomen

 

Colouring the Past - portrait

Get To Know Your Street – Birkdale Street, Floreat

Birkdale Street in Floreat was named for Birkdale near Southport, Lancashire, England as it was the birthplace of William Ernest Bold, Town Clerk of the Perth City Council from 1901 to 1944  (1). Bold was deeply involved in the development of subdivisions in the Floreat area.

Birkdale Village Centre - Birkdale, Southport, Lancashire, England (3

Birkdale Village Centre – Birkdale, Southport, Lancashire, England (2)

The street was part of Darling View Estate and originally called Argyle Street. After the incorporation of Leederville and North Perth into Perth City Council in 1914, many street names had to be changed to avoid confusion with other similarly-named streets. Later, within the Darling View Estate, Argyle Street became Birkdale Street.

The etymology of the word suggests that Birkdale probably takes its name from two Old Norse words, birki meaning “birch-copse” and dalr meaning “dale” or “valley”.(3)

Birkdale Street - Street sign at the corner of Cambridge and Birkdale Streets, Floreat

“Birkdale Street” – Street sign at the corner of Cambridge and Birkdale Streets, Floreat.

Birkdale Street, Floreat, runs between The Boulevard and Underwood Avenue, Floreat, encompassing residential blocks amidst mature trees and shops and restaurants at the intersection with Cambridge Street.

References

(1) Tom Stannage, ‘Bold, William Ernest (1873-1953)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/bold-william-ernest-5282/text8907, published first in hardcopy 1979, accessed online 27 October 2015.

(2) “Birkdale village centre” by Small-town hero – Own work. Licensed under Public Domain via Commons – https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Birkdale_village_centre.JPG#/media/File:Birkdale_village_centre.JPG

(3) Wikipedia contributors, “Birkdale,” Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Birkdale&oldid=681796541 (accessed October 27, 2015).

Remembering the Picture Gardens

From the memoirs of R. L. Rogerson…

“The mid 1940’s and 50’s were a great age for the outdoor picture gardens in summer. With a canopy of stars for a roof and large poplars around the perimeter swaying gently in the evening breeze, we enjoyed the social exchange of seeing and greeting friends. Walking home afterwards, we had plenty of time to chat about the film and enjoy each other’s fellowship.

There were four picture gardens within walking distance from which to choose: The Empire in West Leederville, the Regal in Subiaco, the Wembley Picture Gardens a block from our home and the Cameo Gardens at Pangbourne St. The speakers were set in the screens so that, if you could find a peep hole in the fence or a perch in a tree out the front and see over the lattice baffles, you could enjoy the film without paying. I can’t say that I ever watched a whole film, but on occasions I’d perch for half an hour or so until I got cramped or bored, which ever came first. Deck chairs in the gardens were the standard mode of seating. These were usually in sets of four, so that if the seat was a bit low and we couldn’t see over the top of the people in front, the top board was simply slipped out and the canvas wrapped up a little to take the slack. People took rugs and cushions and could often be seen setting off for the picture gardens loaded with all sorts of gear. During Interval when the perimeter lights came on, masses of insects swarmed around the cones of light, adding to interest. The grass underfoot was soft and deadened the hubbub of audience chatter, and spilled icecreams and drinks were of no consequence.

In today’s airconditioned, carpeted booths, smelling of popcorn, there is nothing of the calm, unhassled atmosphere of the outdoor gardens.” (1.)

Front facade of the Cameo Open Air Picture Gardens, 320 Cambridge Street Wembley, 1948 (Courtesy Battye Library 007549).

Front facade of the Cameo Open Air Picture Gardens, 320 Cambridge Street Wembley, 1948
(Courtesy Battye Library 007549).

Reference

(1.) Rogerson, R. L. 2000, My Grandmother’s Stays: A childhood during depression and war in Wembley Park, Perth, Western Australia, R. L. Rogerson, p. 90.

Paganin House by Iwan Iwanoff

Reposted with permission from Maya Anderson (House Nerd).

If you’ve spent much time in Perth at the beaches near Floreat and City Beach, chances are you’ll have driven past this place – Paganin House, this iconic 1960s house on The Boulevard.

The house was designed by renowned Bulgarian-born architect Iwan Iwanoff, who designed what many people in Perth believe to be the coolest houses in Perth (his famous Marsala House in Dianella still has a light-up disco floor!) Iwanoff died in 1986 of pneumonia, but his name crops up time and time again in unofficial listings of Perth’s best houses and Perth’s best architects, and it will continue to do so, because decades on his houses still draw oohs and ahhs. This place is one.

Paganin House, 165 The Boulevard, Floreat by Maya Anderson

ABOVE: Paganin House today in 2013.

Paganin House Floreat_Maya_Anderson (15)

MARBLE GALORE: The front veranda. The home’s original owners were marble and timber merchants and the home is extensively finished in marble – even around the sides of the house, and to the internal staircase that leads to the undercroft garage. The paving around the pool is marble and so is the floor of the pool house.

Paganin_House_Floreat_Maya_Anderson_(34)

NEUTRAL WALLS: When she renovated Lisa kept the wall colours predominantly neutral, letting the home’s extensive timber features and colourful accents do the talking. The new kitchen now has white Laminate cabinets with timber edging and some solid timber feature cabinets. “The previous owners had done a renovation in the 80s and put in a pink granite kitchen but I stripped it back to what it was,” she says.

Lounge_room_bar_and_dining_room_Paganin_House_by_Maya_Anderson

ABOVE LEFT: The orange glass pendant lights above the bar are original. Lisa used to own a lighting company and the house has wonderful feature lighting, with much of it on dimmers. ABOVE RIGHT: The dining area is all original – even the ceiling with concealed lighting beyond the panels.

Paganin_House_Floreat_Maya_Anderson_(7)

SUMMER EVENINGS BY THE POOL: Lisa says the spot by the pool is her favourite part of the home. “I just spent six months in the UK and all I wanted to do when I got back was sit there and look out at the pool,” she says. “When I left London it was -3 degrees, when I got back to Perth it was six o’clock and it was 35 degrees. I sat out there by the pool with a glass of champagne. I love to have family and friends over.”

Pool_spa_and_billiard_table_in_pool_house_Paganin_House_by_Maya_Anderson

LET’S GO OUTSIDE: The pool area is my favourite part of this place. It cries out for pool parties and for everyone to dance to Twisting By The Pool. GAME OF POOL BY THE POOL? The pool house has a bar (hidden behind that silver curved cupboard) which is flanked by marble cladding. The pool house also has its own marble-finished change room with toilet and shower.

Pool_bar_and_close-up_of_flowers_Paganin_House

ABOVE: You know you have a party house when your house has three bars. Paganin House has one bar in the living area, one in the pool house and this one by the pool. Kind of has a Spanish feel don’t you think?

Paganin_House_Floreat_Maya_Anderson_(32)

Since I was a kid I’ve always kept an eye out for this house as I drove down The Boulevard. Opposite the beautiful golf course, set far back from the street, it’s arresting. When you catch sight of it, tucked between trees, you can almost imagine you are in another era or place like the 60s in Beverly Hills, with the huge palm trees that edge The Boulevard shading the road. It’s that kind of house that makes you wonder who lives there . (And does she dress like Samantha’s mum in Now & Then?)

Born in 1919, Iwanoff migrated to Perth in the 50s but it wasn’t until the 60s that he started his own practice here and Perth is lucky enough to be THE city of his work. His architecture is now recognised internationally and he is regarded as one of our city’s best and most influential architects for his expressionistic style and his striking Brutalist buildings.

Iwanoff houses have so many fans in Perth that I find it interesting that Marsala House in Dianella is the only one of Iwanoff’s houses that are on the heritage register. We haven’t really come to the point yet where we are putting 60s and 70s Perth houses on the heritage register yet (Marsala was built in 1976 and is the youngest house to be heritage-listed in WA) and it seems a bit of a shame, especially when there are so many Iwanoff fans who would kill for one of his homes.

Paganin House owner Lisa Fini tells me an Iwanoff in City Beach was knocked down recently, to the horror of many Iwanoff fans. So I guess you just hope that Iwanoffs go to people who appreciate them.

Lisa is one of them. She bought Paganin House in 1999 after years of lusting after it (and she doesn’t dress like Nancy Sinatra). “I’d always loved this house,” she smiles. “When I was a little girl we used to drive past it all the time.” It’s not just her who has a soft spot for this place. “It seems like everyone who speaks to me says, ‘Ohhh! It’s my favourite house in Perth!’” she laughs.

Front_door_Paganin_House_by_Maya_Anderson

ABOVE: The original front entry door opens onto a foyer. Straight ahead is the kitchen, which can be closed up with a pair of marble inlay doors. To the left of the kitchen is a small sitting area and the home’s four bedrooms. To the right is the dining area, the study and the sunken lounge with bar.

Paganin_House_Floreat_Maya_Anderson_(20)

DINE WITH ME: To the right of the kitchen is the dining with slatted walls and beyond that the sunken lounge that overlooks the 10m pool with diving board and the garden.

Study_Paganin_House_Maya_Anderson

ABOVE: The study at the front of the home has an original curved marble top table.

Paganin_House_Floreat_Maya_Anderson_(3)

THIS IS GOING STRAIGHT TO THE POOL ROOM: The freestanding pool house overlooks the pool with diving board.

Front_and_pool_Paganin_House_by_Maya_Anderson

ABOVE: My favourite things about this house are the gorgeous elevation with the marble panels and the frangipani trees. And the outdoor entertaining area, with the 10m pool with diving board and pool house. The whole place kind of makes me think of an edgier version of the Brady Bunch house. (I don’t think the Brady Bunch had three bars).

Pool_and_pool_room_Paganin_House

ABOVE: The pool house Iwanoff designed has huge floor-to-ceiling sliding doors – something we are seeing a lot in new houses these days, but back in the 60s it would have been rare!

Fireplace_and_diving_board_by_Maya_Anderson_Paganin_House

ABOVE: The marble surround fireplace in the pool room. ABOVE RIGHT: There is something about this garden and its location that reminds me of Breaking Bad.

Paganin_House_Floreat_Maya_Anderson_(10)

ABOVE: By the side of the house, jarrah panels can be lifted to allow for cross-ventilation. Iwanoff incorporated numerous solar passive principles into the house.

Lounge_Room_and_Pool_Bar_Paganin_House_by_Maya_Anderson

ABOVE: The house’s original marble and timber merchant owners definitely went to town with the marble in their own home. Marble was used around the pool, to the laundry drying courtyard and even to the internal staircase to the garage.

Paganin House has only changed hands once – Iwanoff designed it for its first owners, a family with four children, who moved into the house in 1965 and only moved out in 1999. The house was well ahead of its time, built in an age when open-plan living was still rare. It also has features that many houses didn’t have back then – such as internal entry to the double garage, full-height sliding doors to the pool house, numerous bars (the house has three!) It’s now going to auction.

Lisa says one of the great things of the design is that from the street, despite the extensive glazing to the elevation, there is a sense of privacy as passers-by cannot tell what’s going on inside. Even at night, when the house is lit up, the elevated block combined with Iwanoff’s combination of clever angles, marble privacy panels and a floor plan that utilises an undercroft garage means people from the street can’t see what the people inside are doing.

“It’s open, but you don’t feel like you’re on display,” says Lisa. So that means when certain people drive slowly past, craning their necks trying to get a peek inside *coughs* they pretty much can’t see a thing inside.

Yep, Iwanoff was a pretty smart dude. “He was such a clever architect,” says Lisa. “The design is just incredible.” Maya x

References

  1. Originally posted on House Nerd on 24 March 2013 by and reproduced with the kind permission of Maya Anderson. Please note that photos by Acorn, as used in the original post, have not been reproduced here as permission to reproduce them on ‘Follow the Old Plank Road’ has yet to be received.
  2. Original post: http://www.house-nerd.com/articles/paganin-house-by-iwan-iwanoff
  3. Photos shown in this post were taken by Maya Anderson.

Get To Know Your Street: The Boulevard, Floreat and City Beach

The original design for the suburbs of Floreat and City Beach was created by surveyors Messrs Hope and Klem and adopted by the Perth City Council in September 1925. They provided the initial layout for a seaside town and an inland residential town near the eastern side of the estate, with the indigenous tuart forest retained in between. The design also laid out the route of a new access road or boulevard (The Boulevard) three chains wide and running from the end of Cambridge Street, through the residential town to the seaside town then turning south to connect up with the end of the plank road. They suggested a direct connection between Hay Street and the new boulevard for quick and easy access to the beach (Selby Street eventually served as this connection). Permanent and fast transport links with Perth and between the two townsites were considered essential for the development of the area. A tram service to the coast, running down the centre of the boulevard, was intended but never eventuated.

In February 1927 the Perth City Council appointed a Special Committee to report on the steps that needed to be taken by the Council in order to implement the Hope and Klem plan for the Endowment Lands and Limekiln Estate (the future Floreat and City Beach). They estimated that £100,000 would be required to construct the main road to the beach and to carry out the developmental work that would be necessary before lots at City Beach could be offered for sale. £20,000 was set aside for initial construction of the boulevard – waterbound macadam painted with bitumen. This road was then to be upgraded to a permanent road after two years, by covering with a 3 inch (7.5 cm) layer of bitumen, at an estimated cost of £12,000. Plans and specifications were drawn up and tenders invited for the clearing and preparation of the route of the new boulevard.

The first sod was turned, marking the beginning of construction of The Boulevard to City Beach on 16 December 1927.

Ph0125-01 Hon A McCallum Minister for Works turning first sod of The Boulevard 16 Dec 1927

Ph0125-01 Hon A McCallum Minister for Works turning first sod of The Boulevard 16 Dec 1927

Ph0125-02 Turning first sod of The Boulevard 16 Dec 1927

Ph0125-02 Turning first sod of The Boulevard 16 Dec 1927
Mr Hamer, Sir Wm Lathlain, Cr Simper, Cr Gould, Cr Harper, Mr W E Bold, J T Franklin (Mayor), W A Laker, A. McCallum MLA, Cr Wells, Cr Holland, Cr Farr, J Macfarlane MLC, H G Atwell.

Construction of the Boulevard

A & A Wedgwood won the contract for clearing, cutting and filling along the route of the new road. Todd Bros were then given the contract for the gravel sub-grade work. Finishing of the road was done by the Perth City Council itself. Using additional funds from Council reserves, the road was permanently sealed with bitumen at the time of construction. The electricity supply was constructed from the junction with Cambridge Street along the length of the new boulevard to a transformer at the beach townsite, then along the beach road to the end of the plank road. Once the power supply was in place, the City Engineer was able to use it to run a sluicing trial, pumping water from the sea on to the sand dunes to level them. In anticipation of increased traffic on the new boulevard and the old plank road, the Perth City Council gained approval from the State Government to make both roads, and the beach road that connected them, one-way thoroughfares. This was changed in 1929 allowing two-way traffic on The Boulevard to make the transportation of building materials to the new subdivision easier.

Ph0107-01 Construction of The Boulevard, 1927-1928 [Art Photo Engravers (Perth, W.A.).]

Ph0107-01 Construction of The Boulevard, 1927-1928 [Art Photo Engravers (Perth, W.A.).]

Ph0107-02 Grading The Boulevard to City Beach, Dec 1927 [Art Photo Engravers (Perth, W.A.).]

Ph0107-02 Grading The Boulevard to City Beach, Dec 1927 [Art Photo Engravers (Perth, W.A.).]

Ph0107-03 Construction of The Boulevard, 1927-1928

Ph0107-03 Construction of The Boulevard, 1927-1928 [Art Photo Engravers (Perth, W.A.).]

Ph0107-04 Construction of The Boulevard, 1927-1928 [Art Photo Engravers (Perth, W.A.).]

Ph0107-04 Construction of The Boulevard, 1927-1928 [Art Photo Engravers (Perth, W.A.).]

Ph0107-05 Construction of The Boulevard, 1927-1928 [Art Photo Engravers (Perth, W.A.).]

Ph0107-05 Construction of The Boulevard, 1927-1928 [Art Photo Engravers (Perth, W.A.).]

The Boulevard was officially opened by the Governor on 23 November 1928

Ph0116-01 Opening of The Boulevard, City Beach, by the Governor, 23 Nov 1928

Ph0116-01 Opening of The Boulevard, City Beach, by the Governor, 23 Nov 1928

Ph0116-02 Construction of The Boulevard, City Beach, 1927-1928 [Appears to be a ceremony, possibly the opening.]

Ph0116-02 Construction of The Boulevard, City Beach, 1927-1928 [Appears to be a ceremony, possibly the opening.]

Ph0116-03 Construction of The Boulevard, City Beach, 1927-1928 [Appears to be a ceremony, possibly the opening.]

Ph0116-03 Construction of The Boulevard, City Beach, 1927-1928 [Appears to be a ceremony, possibly the opening.]

Ph0116-04 Construction of The Boulevard, City Beach - official opening speech 1928

Ph0116-04 Construction of The Boulevard, City Beach – official opening speech 1928

Ph0182-01 The Boulevard, possibly late 1920s

Ph0182-01 The Boulevard, possibly late 1920s

On the 24 July 1929, Governor and Lady Campion and other guests, including past Mayors and present Councillors of Perth City Council attended a function at the junction of The Boulevard and Cambridge Street to plant a tree in the new Boulevard in commemoration of the Centenary of the City of Perth

To mark the commemoration of both the Centenary of the City of Perth and the first subdivision at City Beach, a total of 365 trees were to be planted all along the Boulevard. Each guest planted a tree and was given a small souvenir silver shovel. See our other posts on ‘The Boulevard Treescape’ and ‘Commemorative “Shovel” Found!’ For more information.

In October 1930 the Federal Bus Company began a bus service to City Beach North via The Boulevard, as an extension of the existing City to Wembley service. Buses ran hourly each way at peak times, and two hourly in off-peak times.

Ph0165-01 First Grey Bus on City Beach run, no date

Ph0165-01 First Grey Bus on City Beach run, no date

In 1939 Perth City Council began widening and extending The Boulevard.

Ph0421-01 PCC engineering works - The Boulevard, Floreat Park, late 1930s

Ph0421-01 PCC engineering works – The Boulevard, Floreat Park, late 1930s

Ph0421-02 PCC engineering works - The Boulevard, Floreat Park, late 1930s

Ph0421-02 PCC engineering works – The Boulevard, Floreat Park, late 1930s

In 1941 The Boulevard and Oceanic Drive were widened and generally upgraded to cater for the increasing traffic in the area.

In discussing improvements to The Boulevard, the Lord Mayor’s Report, 1940-41, notes: “The foundations of this road, between Linden Gardens (Floreat Park) and City Beach, were widened from 15-ft to 20-ft, thereby creating a much needed improvement in road space. The curves in the old road were very sharp, and these have been eased, and the roadway at these places super-elevated. The road is now perfectly safe for two-way traffic. It is hoped that the Council in the near future will be in a position to surface the widened section and to resurface the old section.”

Improvements listed under expenditure in the General Revenue Account included among other projects, funding for the Boulevard to be extended between Linden Gardens to the Beach, widening it to 20-ft foundations only at a cost of £3,364.18.6.

1943 saw the planting of sixty jacaranda trees along The Boulevard in Floreat, at a cost of £62.4.0. The distinctive purple colouring of this flowering tree providing a different shade of colour to the Boulevard Treescape.

Little has changed along The Boulevard over the years and the road to this day remains an iconic link from Cambridge Street in Floreat through to the Beach, its shaded arbours testifying to a proud past and a flourishing future.

Cambridge Heritage Trail

The Town, in conjunction with the Lions Club of Floreat, has recently completed an upgrade of the Cambridge Heritage Trail.

First opened on 26 January 2001, to celebrate the Federation of Australia, the trail identifies key locations of historical significance in West Leederville, Wembley, Floreat and City Beach, providing an interesting insight into the people, events and places of a bygone era.

Over time, due to weather, bore water, graffiti and vandalism, many of the signs deteriorated and were in poor condition, prompting the Town and Lions Club of Floreat to embark on an upgrade of the Heritage Trail, each contributing $20,000 to the project.

The original 17 interpretive plaques were renewed and an additional 6 plaques have been installed, providing a total of 23 interpretive plaques at sites along the trail.

Map of the Cambridge Heritage Trail, 2015.

Map of the Cambridge Heritage Trail, 2015.

The new sites include:

  • Leederville Town Hall, Recreation Club and Cenotaph
  • Holyrood Street
  • The Skyline Drive-in
  • Wembley Golf Course
  • The Boulevard
  • Empire Games Village
The interpretive panel for Holyrood Street (a new site on the Heritage Trail) 2015

The interpretive panel for Holyrood Street (a new site on the Heritage Trail) 2015

You are invited to enjoy a stroll along the Cambridge Heritage Trail as it meanders past historic sites within the Town, and marvel at the buildings and locations that reflect the history and development of the area.

Follow the trail route described in the Heritage Trail brochure available at all Town of Cambridge sites including the Cambridge Library or by downloading a copy here:Cambridge Heritage Trail brochure

Cover of the new Cambridge Heritage Trail Brochure.

Cover of the new Cambridge Heritage Trail Brochure.

The Program: National Family History Month

The event program for National Family History Month has arrived

‘Scan the Clan’

Do you want to ensure that your family photographs are protected and won’t deteriorate over time? Book a one-on-one session with the Local Studies Librarian Rosemary Ritorto and learn how to scan and store your family photographs and other documents.

Mondays in August (3, 10, 17, 24 & 31) – 11.00am – 12.00pm

Cambridge Library Local Studies Office – Bookings Essential

Please bring Image(s)/document(s) you want to work with and a USB stick

Dancing with Skeletons

All families have patterns that are passed down through the generations – they can include: pioneering, creative and    artistic skills, money, health, love, loss and war service issues. Discover how to dance with the skeletons of your past in this session presented by Judith Hamilton.

Wednesday, 12 August – 10.00am – 11.30am

Cambridge Library Reading Room

Morning Tea is provided at this free session but bookings are essential

Mapping your Family History

Join our Local Studies Librarian Rosemary Ritorto and share your historical research online with friends and family in a fun and interactive way. Using Historypin and Google Maps, staff will demonstrate how to set up a free account and start adding content to geographical locations.

Thursday, 14 August – 10.00am – 12.00pm

Cambridge Library Group Study Room

Spaces are limited to 10 (6 computers provided but 4 people need to bring laptops or partner up on day)

Please bring a USB stick with image(s) that you want to work with.

Morning Tea is provided at this free session but bookings are essential

Researching the History of your House

Presented by Kristy Bizzaca (BA (Hons.) MA MPHA) this talk will help you to unlock the secret history of your house, looking at the major record sources available to family history  researchers.

Wednesday, 19 August – 10.00am – 11.30am

Cambridge Library Reading Room

Morning Tea is provided at this free session but bookings are essential

Preserving Family Photos and Documents

Paul Malone will discuss how to preserve family letters, documents and photographs. The session will also show how best to store archival material and for the budget conscious, low cost options for safe storage. Paul Malone has worked in conservation and preservation at the State Library of WA for many years and now runs his own business in North Perth called Preservation Services.

Thursday, 27 August – 10.00am – 11.30am

Cambridge Library Reading Room

 Morning Tea is provided at this free session but bookings are essential

To book for a session please contact Cambridge Library on 9383 8999 or email: library@cambridge.wa.gov.au

Download the print version of the Program here FHM_2015_Brochure

We look forward to seeing you at the Library soon.

Coming Soon: National Family History Month

Well it is that time of year again when we celebrate our efforts and learn how to climb higher up our family trees – Yes it is National Family History Month this August.

'Scan the Clan'  Learn how to scan your precious family photos and document

‘Scan the Clan’
Learn how to scan your precious family photos and document

Mapping your Family History using Historypin We'll show you how!

Mapping your Family History using Historypin
We’ll show you how!

There will be several events running @ Cambridge Library throughout the month to celebrate including, ‘Researching the History of your House’ and ‘Mapping your Family History’.

All sessions are free to attend but bookings are essential for catering purposes.

The complete program will be posted shortly..

Researching the History of your House

Researching the History of your House

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