Cambridge Remembers – Private James Stewart Furniss

furniss, james stewart

Discover the stories of our brave men and women from the area within the Town of Cambridge throughout the years by following the link below.

“Cambridge Remembers” a collection within our Cambridge Notes database that honours our heroes and heroines:

https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p20029coll5

 

The Ode

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them (1).

 

 

References:

 

  1. Binyon, Laurence 1914, ‘The Ode’, [from] For the Fallen, The Times [London, England], 21st September 1914.
  2. Image of Pte James Stewart Furniss Courtesy Australia’s Fighting Sons of the Empire, p. 92.
  3. Attestation Papers of Pte James Stewart Furniss Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia:  https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=4036294

 

 

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We Will Remember Them – Poetry of Remembrance – part three

Written in March 2017 after he saw one of the Anzac Day window displays in our Local Studies office here in the Cambridge Library, Lindsay Evans was inspired to craft this poem.

It is a poem that brings to life the 175 men from the cenotaph in West Leederville, showcasing their everyday lives and careers, reminding us that these were ordinary men in extraordinary circumstances. These men gave their all for our country and freedoms which we hold dear. Like Lindsay, I think we all would agree – “..how can we ever thank you enough?”

A Salute - a poem by Lindsay Evans

 

We Will Remember Them

We Will Remember Them – Poetry of Remembrance – part two

In the midst of creating our own “Flanders Field” of poppies, staff and patrons also expressed their thoughts about poppies, war, sacrifice and peace through poetry.

So it is with great pleasure that we share with you the next poem from our Armistice Centenary display in the Library, On Flanders Field by Lindsay Evans.

On Flanders Field - by Lindsay Evans - a poem

We Will Remember Them – Poetry of Remembrance – part one

Since Anzac Day 2018, staff and patrons of Cambridge Library have been knitting and crocheting poppies, both to send a set to the RSL Poppy Project and to have a set of 175 poppies to display at Cambridge Library. Why 175? Well that is because there are 175 names of men who made the supreme sacrifice listed on the cenotaph in West Leederville, so we wanted one poppy to represent each man.

In the midst of this project to create our own “Flanders Field” of poppies, staff and patrons also expressed their thoughts about poppies, war, sacrifice and peace through poetry.

So it is with great pleasure that we share with you one of the poems from our Armistice Centenary display in the Library,  The Poppies by Emily Paull.

The Poppies - Emily Paull
The Poppies Copyright Emily Paull 24/10/2018. All Rights Reserved.

West Leederville War Memorial – Part One

Leederville Cenotaph with rose in the foreground (20151112)w e
West Leederville War Memorial [also known as West Leederville Cenotaph, or West Leederville Fallen Soldiers’ Memorial]

The need for a war memorial[1] in West Leederville was first put forward at a public meeting, convened by the Leederville sub-branch of the R.S.L. and the ladies’ auxiliary, in the Leederville Town Hall on Tuesday, 11th July 1922[2]. Many suggestions and comments were made on what constituted an appropriate memorial to the fallen of the district, and subsequently a committee was formed to take up the cause.

1922 'SOLDIERS' MEMORIAL.', The West Australian (Perth, WA - 1879 - 1954), 12 July, p. 8.

Officially unveiled on Sunday 25th May 1924, the war memorial at Cambridge Street, West Leederville contained originally 88 names on a bronze slab on the front of a pedestal. “It is a granite obelisk rough hewn, and mounting upwards from a base of massive proportions. Facing outwards from each corner are four crouching lions, sculptured in white marble… Thanks mainly to the efforts of the women and children of the district, the memorial would be handed over to the trustees free of debt, which was as it should be, when it was remembered it was erected in memory of men who though no sacrifice too great… The Governor [Sir Frances Newdegate said in his speech that] the memorial would serve as a fitting monument to those who had achieved great glory. There were three great reasons for the erection of the memorial: (1) Affection for those who had fallen: (2) respect and sympathy for those who had gone and returned and for the relative of those who had not: and (3) a lasting object-lesson of the patriotism and duty of the people of Leederville.”    [3] 

 

Leederville War Memorial - Unveiled by the Governor - The West Australia, Monday 26 May 1924, p. 6

 

Did You Know - Cenotaph

 

In a photograph published in the newspapers of the day, you can see Cambridge Street, heading towards Perth, CBD and the Leederville memorial on the left. The dark rectangular section appearing on the lower part of the obelisk, above the four lions, is most likely the bronze plaque containing the names of 88 local boys.[4] 

 

[Picture of Cambridge Street with the Leederville War Memorial on the left] - The Western Mail, Thursday 30 July 1925, p. 3
[Picture of Cambridge Street with the Leederville War Memorial on the left] – The Western Mail, Thursday 30 July 1925, p. 3

The war memorial was designed by Pietro Giacomo Porcelli (1872-1943) a sculptor of considerable note in Western Australia; he was born in Bisceglie, Bari, Italy on the 30th January 1872. At the age of eight he went to Sydney with his father and became interested in drawing and sculpting. Later Porcelli trained at the Royal Academy of Naples, Italy and won many prizes for his works whilst earning his diploma. In 1898 Porcelli came to Western Australia with his father and started to carve out a name for himself.[5] Porcelli designed and crafted many statues, busts and memorials, two of his most famous being the C. Y. O’Connor Memorial and the Midland Railway Workers’ Peace Memorial. He designed many war memorials including the Yarloop War Memorial which also features similar lion sculptures to the West Leederville memorial. The Yarloop lions are however placed much lower down and closer to the base of the memorial than those at West Leederville.

 

Pietro Porcelli - 1911 'No title', Western Mail (Perth, WA - 1885 - 1954), 1 July, p. 24.
Pietro Porcelli – 1911 ‘No title’, Western Mail (Perth, WA – 1885 – 1954), 1 July, p. 24.

 

During the 1930s it appears from newspaper articles that the West Leederville sub-branch of the R.S.L. put out the call to add more names to the memorial stating that it “is difficult to get the names of everybody. It is thought that there are quite a number of names not recorded, so relations are asked to get in touch with the sub-branch” [6] This then explains how one bronze plaque became four marble panels containing 125 names.

On the Centenary of Anzac, the 25th April 2018, the Town of Cambridge added 50 extra names to the memorial, replacing the old north facing panel with new marble carved with the original names at top and the new names below, taking the total number of soldiers listed on the memorial to 175.

A feature on the West Leederville War Memorial is the four crouching lions made from white marble and each of their bronze shields. Each shield names a major conflict zone in World War I, fields of war where the majority of the Leederville men fell. The shields read: Belgium, Gallipoli, France and Palestine. Some say that crouching lions are symbols of the British Empire [7]  they are also known to convey a sense of majesty and awe. Lions being bold animals, they also signify courage in heraldry[8], so the four lions on the West Leederville memorial are apt to represent our courageous serving men and women, both past and present.

The 'Gallipoli Lion' on the Leederville Cenotaph (20151112)w e
The ‘Gallipoli Lion’ on the Leederville Cenotaph, 2015

 

PENTAX Image
Ph0780-11 West Leederville War Memorial & Rose Garden, October 2007

 

Leederville Cenotaph from the 'Palestine Lion' corner
Leederville Cenotaph from the ‘Palestine Lion’ corner

 

Names on the West Leederville Cenotaph
Our Heroes

Erected by the Residents of Leederville to the Sacred Memory of the HEROES who enlisted from this district and fell in the war 1914 – 1918″

Adkins             Charles

Allen                H

Anthony,         George Henry

Atkins,             Francis Edward

Aylett,              Frank Thomas Lewis

Bamford,         Charles Edwin

Bartlett,                     John Edwin

Beckett,                     John

Blechnyden,    Leslie Thomas

Blick,               Percival Swithin

Bowen,           James William

Brady,              Edgar Vernon

Bray,               Harold Oswald

Bromham,        Louis Frederick

Brooks,           Thomas

Brown,             F

Brown,             Thomas Hugh

Brown,             Charles (WWII)

Caporn,           Percy

Caporn,           Walter Edward

Carlin,              Eric Brooke

Carter,             Ernest

Carter,             Harold Reginald

Challenger,      Frederick Gordon

Challenger,  F

Chappell,         Alfred Hart

Clark,               Herbert Holman

Cockburn,        George

Cocks,             Frederick James

Cope,               F

Cornish,          Reginald Henry

Crawford,        William James

Cross,              Albert

Darby,             Edward Harry

Dawson,          Frank Willis

Debnam,         George Parkman

Denton,                     Arthur Jacob

Deverell,          Louis Horatio Albert

Dixon,              H F A

Drabble,          Wilfred Ernest

Dunstan,                  Percy Philip

Edmondson,    Edwin

Edmondson,    James Whittaker

Eliasson,          Carl Alfred

Elliot,               Thomas Hampton

Flanagan,        Frances Charles (WWII)

Foster,             Thomas Charles

Furniss,           James Stewart

George,           Frederick Ralph

Gibson,           James

Gilbert,           Percy George

Graham,          John Charles

Graham,           James m.m.

Grant,    Donald McDonald, AKA Donald Maxwell Grant.

Greay,             Herbert

Greay,             Samson

Gudgeon,        Christopher

Haley,              Frederick Lewis

Hancey,                     Edwin Banthorpe

Harms,             Charley

Hawkes,          Frederick Henry

Henderson,      Edward Thomas

Hennerty,        Joseph Leonard

Hett,                George

Higgs,              Charles

Higgs,              William

Hill,                  Rowland Joseph

Hinson,           Charles Henry

Hislop,             James

Hodgson,         Joseph

Holden,           Charles Edwin

Holder,             John Leggo

Holder,             Harry

Horley,             David George (WWII)

Howieson,        David

Hull,                 Joseph

Hutchins,         Victor Charles

Hutchinson,     James Wesley

Ion,                 John

Ion,                 J P  (WWII)

Ivison,             James Miller

James,             C

James,             Albert Victor Gordon

Jarvis,              Ephraim

Jones,              Charles Edward

Kempton,       Clarence Thomas (WWII)

Kerr,                J

Kneebone,       Joseph Keith (WWII)

Kyrwood,         Roy Garfield

Lamerton,         George Arthur

Lamerton,        William John

Lewis,              Griffith David

Lyons,             James

Mansfield,       Herbert Alfred

Marquis,          Clarence George

Marsland,        John Charles

Martin,             C T

McCormack,     John Joseph

McDonald,       I S

McDougal,       R

McGovern,       Kevin M

McGuire,          Martin Augustus

McMillan,         T J (MM)

McNeill,           Norman Frederick

McRostie,         William Bertram

Melrose,           Wilson

Miles,               Robert Steven MC

Minn,               Robert Charles

Moore,   John William Beverhoudt

Moran,             Alfred Stephen

Morgan,                     C

Mosey,             Joseph Albert

Moulson,         Alfred

Mullane,          John James Christopher

Mullane,          William Edward

Mullins,           John

Munday,          Charles Forrest Hill

Newman,         Jack Carter

O’Reilly,                     Frank

Oates,              Clifford Nicholas

O’Neil,              A

Oversby,          Thomas Edward

Paterson,         William Hamilton

Paterson,         John

Pearson,          Horace William

Plummer,         Harold Alexander

Porter,             George John

Power,            Robert (WWII)

Priestley,         Henry James Vivian

Randell,                     J

Randle,           John

Rawes,             Edward

Richardson

Rickson,                    Stanley Ernest

Robertson,       Percy William

Ryan,               Stephen

Saunders,        R V

Selby,              Samuel Vaughan

Seymour,          N

Siggs,              Roland Alfred

Simcock,          David John

Smeed,           Leonard Arthur

Smith,           Farquhar Hugh Arpafeelie

Smith,              H W V

Smith,              R O

Smith,              Frederick William

Smith,              David

Smith,              Stewart Irwin

Souter,           James McGurgan

Stranger                    A

Stranger,         Thomas James

Sumner,          Cyril William

Taylor,             E J

Taylor,             R J

Thomas,          William Arnold Spencer

Thompson,      R

Thomson,        H

Thorpe,            Charles Forder Thorpe

Tolano,           Phil

Tough,             Robert Alfred Edgar

Townshend,     Edwin Hepburn

Tuffin,             Edwin (WWII?)

Turvey,           William

Vernede, Charles William Ewart (WWII)

Wall,                C

Walsh,             Thomas Henry

Warden,           James Greig

White,              Morris

Wilkes,             Herbert (MM)

Wisher,           Stewart Frederick

Withers,          F

Woollcott,        Ernest

Wrightson,      Arthur Harry

Wyatt,             Wyatt James

Heores of WWI - 1st panel on the WL Cenotaph
First panel – West Leederville War Memorial
Heroes of WWI - 2nd panel on the WL Cenotaph
2nd panel of the West Leederville War Memorial
Heroes of WWI - 3 panel on the WL Cenotaph
3rd panel of the West Leederville War Memorial
Heroes of WWI - 4th panel on the WL Cenotaph
Old 4th panel on the West Leederville War Memorial
4th Panel - Leederville Fallen Soldiers' Memorial
New 4th panel on the West Leederville War Memorial, added in 2015

 

Look out for Part Two of the story of the West Leederville War Memorial next week…

 

 

References:

[1] A war memorial can also be referred to as a cenotaph or fallen soldiers’  memorial.

[2] 1922 ‘SOLDIERS’ MEMORIAL.’, The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 – 1954),  12 July, p. 8. , viewed 01 Nov 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article28173653

[3] 1924 ‘LEEDERVILLE WAR MEMORIAL.’, The West Australian (Perth, WA : 1879 – 1954), 26 May, p. 6. , viewed 01 Nov 2018, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article31233122

[4] [Picture of Cambridge Street with the Leederville War Memorial on the left] – The Western Mail, Thursday 30 July 1925, p. 3

[5] Simon Keane, ‘Porcelli, Pietro Giacomo (1872–1943)’, Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/porcelli-pietro-giacomo-8080/text14025, published first in hardcopy 1988, accessed online 1 November 2018.

[6] [West Leederville sub branch of RSL] – Sunday Times, Sunday 9 March 1930, p. 1 – more names to be added

[7] McKay, Judith 23rd June 2014, ‘Memorial symbolism’, Queensland War Memorial Register, Queensland Government, accessed 1 November 2018: https://www.qldwarmemorials.com.au/traditions/symbolism/

[8] Wikipedia contributors. (2018, October 27). Cultural depictions of lions. In Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Retrieved 09:32, November 1, 2018, from https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cultural_depictions_of_lions&oldid=865961661

 

Cambridge Remembers – David John Simcock “Pink Top”

Simcock, David John
David John Simcock, aka “Pink Top”

Shortly before dawn on 25 April 1915 Western Australians from the 11th Battalion, A I F, made an opposed landing on the Gallipoli peninsular. Among them was thirty-two year old Private John Simcock.

David, son of Edward and Bertha Simcock, was born in Callington, South Australia, in 1883. The family moved to Perth about 1904-5. In 1906, the same year his father died, David met and married Ellen Jane Collins. The couple bought a house in Derby Street, West Leederville opposite Ellen’s parents, and had their first child, Doris Evelyn, in 1907. A second child, Norman David, was born in 1911.

David tried his hand at a number of jobs before purchasing a barrow license and selling fruit from the corner of High and Market Streets, Fremantle. His lively banter and keen sense of humour ensured his barrow was always well patronised. People crowded around, watching him sell his wares or reading his entertaining and amusing signs.

David John Simcock, aka Pink Top, circa 1912 (courtesy of WAGS)
David John Simcock, aka Pink Top, circa 1912 (courtesy of WAGS)

Having red hair, David promoted himself as ‘the bloke with the pink top’. The nickname stuck. Good salesmanship and quality produce ensured Pink Top’s business would prosper.

In 1909 he took a lease on a former bootmaker’s shop at 126 Barrack Street, Perth, and registered it as a fruit shop. The West Australian newspaper subsequently reported that his ‘altogether novel methods of effecting rapid sales, his known wit and his no mean gift as an orator, made him a conspicuous figure and he soon became one of the identities of the city’.

The intersection of Barrack and Wellington Streets, c. 1909
The intersection of Barrack and Wellington Streets, c. 1909

 

Above David, the bloke with the Pink Top, and his shop front display

On Saturday nights, in order to clear his stock, he would sell a bag of fruit for a shilling. Special customers would find threepence in the bottom of the bag. Trams, which ran past the front of his shop, were often held up by the crowds he attracted.

Fruiter and greengrocers committee 1st annual picnic, 4 October 1913. Bowler hatted Pink Top is standing on the extreme right of the group.
Fruiter and greengrocers committee 1st annual picnic, 4 October 1913. Bowler hatted Pink Top is standing on the extreme right of the group.

Early in 1914 David opened a second shop in Fremantle, on the corner of High and Pakenham Streets. He advertised the fact with an ad in the Fremantle Herald newspaper in which he called himself ‘Pink Top – the red-headed Chinaman’, an obvious play on the local Chinese market gardeners.

David enlisted not long after war was declared. No. 951, Private David John Simcock, H Company 11th Battalion, A.I.F., passed his medical on 11 September 1914. He was then thirty-one years of age. The surviving medical report notes that David stood five feet eight and a half inches tall, weighed one hundred and forty-four pounds and had a chest measurement of thirty six and one half inches. He was of fair complexion, blue eyes and had ‘ruddy’ hair.

On his attestation paper, signed at Blackboy Hill training camp the same day, David nominated his wife, Ellen Simcock, of 4 Holyrood Street, West Leederville, as his next of kin.

D Company

Prior to leaving for Gallipoli the 11th Battalion’s commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Lyon-Johnston, had suggested a group photograph to ‘commemorate the campaign and be a souvenir of the war’.

All members not on duty were paraded in front of the Great Pyramid of Cheops. It was subsequently reported that as ‘soon as the vast crowd had placed themselves upon the lower strata of the said relic of the Pharaohs, someone asked where Pink Top was. “Down here!” called out a private in the foundation layer. “Send him up to the top of all the men!” called out the Colonel. “We must have Pink Top at the apex”.’

Whether the story is true or not, Private David Simcock can be clearly seen standing to attention at the top of his battalion in the historic pyramid photograph.

David can be clearly seen at the apex of his battalion on the Great Pyramid of Cheops
David can be clearly seen at the apex of his battalion on the Great Pyramid of Cheops in this cropped image from the historic photograph of the 11th Battalion.

David was amongst the many West Australians who landed at Gallipoli on the 25th of April 1915.

Curiously, despite David’s popularity, there is an element of mystery about the cause, and date of his death. According to one newspaper report, David was killed on 25 April. It claimed that ‘The officer in charge of his company was shot down and, there being no one to lead the men, “Pinktop” volunteered and took command. He gave the order to charge, and they did not stop until poor “Pinktop” had just gained the top of the hill. Just as he said, “Come on boys”, he was hit full in the face by shrapnel and blown to pieces’.

Apparently based on the same source, another report, in the 15 June 1915 edition of the West Australian newspaper, claimed that Simcock’s end was a gallant one, having been ‘killed by shrapnel while leading his company in a charge on the Turkish positions after all the officers had been shot down’.

In 1921, in the second volume ‘Official History of Australia in the War of 1914-18 – The Story of Anzac’, the noted author and war correspondent C.E.W. Bean gave a different account of David’s death. He wrote that on the night of Sunday 25 April, Simcock was killed while trying to bring a wounded man into cover during a Turkish attack on Baby 700.6

In 1940, writer of the unit history of the 11th Battalion, provided yet another account and a later date of David’s death. This source claimed that Simcock had been killed in early May by a sniper on Sniper’s Ridge. He wrote that ‘Poor old “Pinktop” was killed early in the action through bobbing up and down in the trench, trying to get a look at what was going on. Unfortunately, he bobbed up once too often’.7 According to defence department records, however, David John Simcock, 11th Battalion, 3rd Infantry Brigade, was killed in action at the Dardenelles on 2 May 1915.

Regardless of how he met his end, David Simcock, the irrepressible ‘Pink Top’, was widely mourned by fruit growers and others in the market industry as well as his countless friends and customers. For many years, however, David’s memory lived on, immortalized by his Barrack Street fruit shop which continued to trade until 1979 under the name ‘The Pink Top’.

David Simcock is buried in the Baby 700 cemetery. He lies with 492 other Commonwealth servicemen who are commemorated in this cemetery but there are some 450 men who are yet to be unidentified.

For His King and Country

 

Grave at Baby 700
David’s grave at Baby 700 Cemetery

 

David Simcock's widow Ellen with their two children, Norman and Doris c. 1925

 

Wise_s Post Office Directory, 1916 showing Pink Top_s widow Ellen still living at No. 4 Holyrood Street.
Wise’s Post Office Directory, 1916 showing Pink Top’s widow Ellen still living at No. 4 Holyrood Street.

Cambridge Remembers – Private William James Crawford

Crawford, William James

 

WILLIAM JAMES “FAT” CRAWFORD

Born on the  24th June 1889 in Fernvale Queensland. He was the eighth of eleven children to James and Wilhelmina Crawford originally from Dundee Scotland and who immigrated to Queensland in 1883. The family moved to Western Australia around 1890.

The family lived at ‘Villa Dundee’ 23 Trevarton Street Leederville.

‘Fat’ lived at the above address and at 43 Loftus Street Leederville.

184 Carr Street Leederville was also a family home.

He played football with East Perth Football Club from 1908 until he enlisted in 1916. He played a total of 97 games and kicked 13 goals. Two other brothers, David and Harold also played for EPFC.

On the 8th January 1913 he married Ethel May Harris of Dudley Street Perth. He was 23 and Ethel was 20. They listed their occupations as Horse Driver and Home Duties.

There were two children to the marriage. Vera May born on the 26th June 1913 and James Herbert born 22nd December 1914.

Family Portrait - W.J and E.M Crawford with James and Vera (1)
Family Portrait – W.J and E.M Crawford with James and Vera

 

‘Fat’ enlisted in the AIF on the 3rd April 1916 at Leederville along with his friend and brother in law Herbert Harris. Also known as Bert or Snow.

At enlistment ‘Fat’ was 5 feet 11 inches tall and weighed 160 pounds.

In Camp at Blackboy Hill (without frame) - JPG
In Camp at Blackboy Hill, 10 April 1916.

They were both allocated as 5th reinforcements to the 51st Battalion on the 1st May 1916 and embarked from Fremantle for England on the 26th September aboard HMAT UGANDA (A66).

They disembarked at Plymouth England on the 16th November 1916.

After training they embarked from Folkstone for Etaples France aboard SS ARUNDEL on the 12th December 1916.

Portrait photo of W. J. Crawford in military uniform and seated on wooden bench_JPG
Portrait photo of W. J. Crawford in military uniform and seated on wooden bench

 

Pte W. J. Crawford in uniform with whip
Pte W. J. Crawford in uniform with whip, possibly on board a transport ship.

They were taken on strength with the 51st Battalion on the 19th December 1916.

‘Fat’ was wounded in action during the Battle of Polygon Wood on the 26th September 1917 and taken to the 3rd Canadian Casualty Clearing Station in Belgium where he died on the 27th September 1917.

Memorial scroll for Pte W. J. Crawford - JPG
Memorial scroll for Pte W. J. Crawford

 

Brother in law Bert had died from wounds on the 28th August 1917 some 4 weeks previously.

‘Fat’ lies buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery in Belgium.

Grave of W. J. Crawford at Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery and surrounds-JPG (11)
Grave of W. J. Crawford at Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery

‘Fat’s’ brother John Henry (Jack) service number 438 enlisted on the 6th January 1916 aged 19 years and served with the 44th Battalion 11th Brigade until discharge on the 22nd August 1919. He served for 3 years and 229 days.

by Jim Crawford, grandson of William James ‘Fat’ Crawford

Pte W. J. Crawford's identification tag (front)
Pte W. J. Crawford’s identification tag (front)
Pte W. J. Crawford's identification tag (reverse)
Pte W. J. Crawford’s identification tag (reverse), showing William’s next of kin and address.
WAFBD medal from the Boulder trials awarded to W. Crawford in 1908 (front)
WAFBD medal from the Boulder trials awarded to W. Crawford in 1908 (front)
WAFBD medal from the Boulder trials awarded to W. Crawford in 1908 (reverse)
WAFBD medal from the Boulder trials awarded to W. Crawford in 1908 (reverse)

 

Silver Medal awarded to William James Crawford a member of the Leederville Volunteer Fire Brigade team that competed at the Western Australian Fire Brigade Demonstrations  (WAFBD) in Boulder during April of 1908. The inscription on the reverse of the medal reads:

“WAFBD

Boulder 1908

2nd Y Coupling 8 Men

Won by

W. Crawford”

The gold medal went to Boulder, the hosts of the demonstrations. The Western Mail reported the results of the competition:

“Y Coupling and Ladder Practice (eight men), Boulder. 41 [points] 3- 5 secs (record for Western Australia) Leederville, 45  2-5 sec; Cue, 46 2-5 sec. In this event North Fremantle were disqualified.” (Western Mail, Saturday 25 April 1908, p. 17)

Regular fire brigade demonstrations were held  to build and test the skills of the men and as most firemen in the time of William Crawford were volunteers, such competitions were fierce and required a high level of physical prowess. The competition for which William won this medal was called the Y Coupling (for 8 men):

“Eight men from each brigade to run 10 yards, pick up and run with hose reel 30 yards to plug, run out length wet canvas hose, break coupling, fix branch, and strike with water a disc 15ft. from the ground; run out another length of hose, disconnect branch and couple first and second length of hose and insert Y coupling, run out another length of hose and attach to Y coupling and take same up ladder and strike disc.”

(description given in The West Australian, Thursday 31 March 1910, p. 5)

 

Ephemera and Medals from Pte William Crawford’s Football Days

An injured footballer - undated clipping from unnamed WA newspaper-JPG
An injured footballer – undated clipping from unnamed WA newspaper
East Perth Football Club - Lady's Ticket 1913_front_JPG
East Perth Football Club – Lady’s Ticket 1913 (front)

 

Best Ruck Man award from Leederville Football Club Season 1908 (Front)

Best Ruck Man award from Leederville Football Club Season 1908 (Front)

 

Best Ruck Man award from Leederville Football Club Season 1908 (Reverse)
Best Ruck Man award from Leederville Football Club Season 1908 (Reverse)

 

Football medal of W. Crawford, EPFC 1910 (Front)
Football medal of W. Crawford, East Perth Football Club 1910 (Front)

 

Football medal of W. Crawford, EPFC 1910 (reverse)
Football medal of W. Crawford, East Perth Football Club 1910 (reverse)

 

From the war service notebook of Pte W. J. Crawford…..

Pte W. J. Crawford's WWI Notebook (6)
Pte W. J. Crawford’s WWI Notebook (cover)
Pte W. J. Crawford's WWI Notebook (8)
Pte W. J. Crawford’s WWI Notebook (end on, showing marbling effect to the pages and clasp).
Pte W. J. Crawford's notebook - inside back p5
“Where did that one lob Bill?” from Pte W. J. Crawford’s notebook
Cartoons from Pte W. J. Crawfords notebook (2)
Cartoon from Pte W. J. Crawford’s notebook
Cartoons from Pte W. J. Crawfords notebook (3)
Cartoon from Pte W. J. Crawford’s notebook
Cartoons from Pte W. J. Crawfords notebook (4)
“Mercy Kamarad Australia” Cartoon from Pte W. J. Crawford’s notebook

 

William James Crawford

Leederville volunteer fire brigade officer;

Football player;

Cartoonist;

Soldier;

Husband and Father

 

 

The Ode

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them (1).

 

Discover the stories of our brave men and women from the area within the Town of Cambridge throughout the years by following the link below.

“Cambridge Remembers” a collection within our Cambridge Notes database that honours our heroes and heroines:

https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p20029coll5

 

 

References:

 

  1. Binyon, Laurence 1914, ‘The Ode’, [from] For the Fallen, The Times [London, England], 21st September 1914.
  2. Images of Pte William James Crawford, family and memorabilia Courtesy Jim Crawford, grandson of William.
  3. Attestation Papers of Pte William James Crawford Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia:  https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=3461349

Cambridge Remembers – Private John James Christopher Mullane

Private John James Christopher Mullane
Private John James Christopher Mullane

Discover the stories of our brave men and women from the area within the Town of Cambridge throughout the years by following the link below.

“Cambridge Remembers” a collection within our Cambridge Notes database that honours our heroes and heroines:

https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p20029coll5

 

The Ode

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them (1).

 

References:

 

  1. Binyon, Laurence 1914, ‘The Ode’, [from] For the Fallen, The Times [London, England], 21st September 1914.
  2. Image of Pte John James Christopher Mullane, Courtesy of Faithe Jones, from her website: WWI Pictorial Honour Roll of Australians, http://ww1.gravesecrets.net/
  3. Attestation Papers of Pte John James Christopher Mullane Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=7985835

 

 

Cambridge Remembers – Private Henry James Vivian Priestley

We Will Remember Them - Henry James Vivian Priestley
We Will Remember Them – Henry James Vivian Priestley

 

Discover the stories of our brave men and women from the area within the Town of Cambridge throughout the years by following the link below.

“Cambridge Remembers” a collection within our Cambridge Notes database that honours our heroes and heroines: https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p20029coll5

Ph0902-01 Memorial plaque in St Barnabas' Church, WL to Private H. J. V. Priestley
Ph0902-01 Memorial plaque in St Barnabas’ Church, West Leederville to Private H. J. V. Priestley

 

Wood and brass memorial erected by Janet Nicola Priestley (nee Tomkins) for her husband in St Barnabas’ Anglican Church, West Leederville.

View of the memorial plaque in situ inside St Barnabas' Anglican Church West Leederville
View of the memorial plaque in situ inside St Barnabas’ Anglican Church West Leederville.

 

 

The Ode

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them (1).

 

 

References:

 

  1. Binyon, Laurence 1914, ‘The Ode’, [from] For the Fallen, The Times [London, England], 21st September 1914.
  2. Image of Pte H. J.V. Priestley courtesy the Priestley Family and the RSL Virtual War Memorial.
  3. Attestation Papers of Pte Henry James Vivian Priestley Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=8020543
  4. Images of wood and brass memorial erected by Janet Nicola Priestley for her husband in St Barnabas’ Anglican Church, West Leederville.

 

Cambridge Remembers – Lieutenant Edwin Edmondson

Lest We Forget Lieutenant Edwin Edmondson

There is a marble memorial plaque erected by Margery Grace Edmondson for her husband that hangs in St Barnabas’ Anglican Church, West Leederville.

Memorial plaque in St Barnabas Anglican Church, West Leederville to Lt Edwin Edmondson
Memorial plaque in St Barnabas Anglican Church, West Leederville to Lt Edwin Edmondson

The quote “Be though faithful unto Death and I will give thee a crown of Life” is from Revelation 2:10c

Close-up of the memorial plaque in St Barnabas Anglican Church, West Leederville to Lt Edwin Edmondson
Close-up of Memorial plaque in St Barnabas Anglican Church, West Leederville to Lt Edwin Edmondson
St Barnabas' Anglican Church, West Leederville
St Barnabas’ Anglican Church, West Leederville
View of the memorial plaque in situ inside St Barnabas' Anglican Church West Leederville
View of the memorial plaque in situ inside St Barnabas’ Anglican Church West Leederville.

 

The Ode

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them (1).

 

References:

 

  1. Binyon, Laurence 1914, ‘The Ode’, [from] For the Fallen, The Times [London, England], 21st September 1914.
  2. Image of Lt Edwin Edmondson from Australia’s Fighting Sons of the Empire, p. 260.
  3. Attestation Papers of Lt Edwin Edmondson Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia: https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=3535433
  4. Images of marble memorial erected by Margery Grace Edmondson for her husband in St Barnabas’ Anglican Church, West Leederville, the outside of the church, and image of the memorial plaque in situ taken by Rosemary Ritorto, Local Studies Librarian, August 2018.