Lest We Forget Charley Harms: His story as read by his Grandson Barry Harms

Private Charley Harms (Courtesy of Barry and Wendy Harms)
Private Charley Harms (Courtesy of Barry and Wendy Harms)

In 2018 the Town of Cambridge applied for and was successful in winning a Federal Government grant for the Armistice Centenary. There have been three (3) major parts of the project to upgrade the Cenotaph and Memorial Gardens in West Leederville.

  • Stage 1 – upgrade of carpark, and
  • Stage 2 – upgrade of the garden & installation of commemorative artwork, which include beautiful mosaic artworks by Jenny Dawson.
  • Stage 3 – audio description in the gazebo.

Stages 1 and 2 have been completed and are now able to be enjoyed by all those who visit the site on Cambridge Street, West Leederville. Stage 3 is set to be finished in a few weeks time. This final part of the project has been to place an audio component in the memorial gardens. Visitors to the gardens and those who choose to sit in the gazebo will have the option to press a button inside the gazebo and a recording will start playing via speakers. The recording is a spoken tribute to the men and women from the area that now comprises the Town of Cambridge who have served their country. It includes the hymn and poignantly beautiful poem by Sir Cecil Spring Rice – I Vow To Thee My Country, written in February 1918. Also in the audio tribute are the stories of 13 of the men who died in service of Australia in World War I. These stories are narrated by the relatives of the fallen.

A short video has been made of the audio tribute to Private Charley Harms and combines the narration by his grandson, Barry Harms, with images that compliment Charley’s story. We hope you enjoy it.

 

https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p20029coll5/id/107/rec/21

 

Cambridge Remembers: Stories of the Fallen - an audio project celebrating the lives of some of the men from World War I who's names appear on the cenotaph at West Leederville - COMING SOON
Cambridge Remembers: Stories of the Fallen – an audio project celebrating the lives of some of the men from World War I who’s names appear on the cenotaph at West Leederville – COMING SOON
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“I always loved to sing”

Elise Longwill 1950. Image courtesy of Jarman Family
Elise Longwill 1950. Image courtesy of Jarman Family.

 

You have to become a bit recognised before you are invited to do broadcasts. Lucie had a studio of a large number of pupils. She was an excellent teacher and unlike quite a number of the singing teachers in Perth at that time, she employed an accompanist in the studio and this left her free to concentrate completely on her pupil. She didn’t have to worry about the accompanying and being at the piano all the time. She could hold your stomach and tell you whether you were breathing properly and demonstrate your stance and all sorts of things about the deportment of stage work.

 

She put on recitals by her pupils at various times of the year. She would have concerts. All of her pupils entered competitions. Her pupils did extremely well every year at the eisteddfod in the various sections. Probably, my first success was winning the Soprano Solo in 1947. I was about 20 by that time.                                                                                                                                    

That would have been when I would have auditioned at the ABC to start doing broadcasts. From then on, until into the 1960s I was a regular broadcaster on the ABC.

 

They send you a contract that would say on such a such a day, at such and such a time, we want you … You have 15 minutes, a 15 minute broadcast and you submit that to them, exactly what you are going to perform in that 15 minutes, just the names and the length of time of each song. They would have already told you that the rehearsal would be at such and such a time and for you to organise yourself to be there. In those days, Phyllis Blott was the official accompanist at the ABC. You would ring Phyllis Blott and make an appointment to have a rehearsal with her beforehand. On the day you would turn up and there would be people in the control room and Phyllis at the piano and you would sing into a microphone.

 

For the first few years it was always a direct, live broadcast. Then after a while, they used to say, this is going to be taped and it wouldn’t be broadcast exactly when you were doing it. It would be broadcast at some later time. In the early days, it was definitely a live broadcast.

Australian Broadcasting Commission Contract. Contract Courtesy of Jarman Family
Australian Broadcasting Commission Contract. Contract Courtesy of Jarman Family

 

I was a finalist in what is now known as the Young Performers Award. It used to be called the ABC Concerto and Vocal competition. I was a finalist one year. It wasn’t until 1950 that I was the winner, (the vocal winner) in Western Australia. After the concert here, I went to Sydney, in July of 1950 and I was chosen as the vocal winner of the whole thing.

 

Elise Longwill boarding flight in Brisbane, 1950, for ABC National Tour. Image Courtesy of Jarman Family
Elise Longwill boarding flight in Brisbane, 1950, for ABC National Tour. Image Courtesy of Jarman Family

 

 

The prize consisted of a contract with the ABC for four weeks visiting each of the other capital cities in the east; that was Adelaide, Melbourne, Hobart and Brisbane, to do a  youth concert in each with the orchestras, plus probably a broadcast in each of the capital cities as well. You had to submit sufficient repertoire and I think there were a couple of arias I used for the orchestral appearances. I had to submit different programmes for the broadcasts.

 

I had done a lead in a repertory production of “Flora Dora”. I think that was the year before. Then I did a lead in “Tales of Hoffman” for the then opera company here. My role was Antonia in the third act of “Tales of Hoffman”.

 

I always loved to sing.

 

This is an extract from an interview with Elise Jarman. If you’ve enjoyed this extract, the full interview can be found in the Cambridge Library and is available for loan.

https://cambridgelibrary.worldcat.org/

 

The Grave of John Henry Monger (1800-1867)

John Henry Monger (1800-1867) was one of the first settlers in the area, receiving a land grant around the lake that was later to be named after him (Monger’s Lake, now Lake Monger). John Henry didn’t stay long before moving to the newly gazetted town of York, but his name liveth forever more in the beauty of the lake that bears his name.

John Henry Monger’s grave and that of his wife and some of his children and grandchildren is located in the East Perth Cemeteries, Bronte St, East Perth WA. These are some photographs taken of his grave in April of 2014.

Ph0911-01 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC -
Ph0911-01 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC

 

Ph0911-02 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Back of monument showing memorial to J. H. and Mary Monger, 1867 and 1864 - for w e
Ph0911-02 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Back of monument showing memorial to J. H. and Mary Monger, 1867 and 1864

 

Ph0911-03 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Back of monument showing memorial to J. H. and Mary Monger, 1867 and 1864 (close-up) - for w e
Ph0911-03 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Back of monument showing memorial to J. H. and Mary Monger, 1867 and 1864 (close-up)

 

Ph0911-04 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - In Loving Memory of Catherine Helen, 1978 - for w e
Ph0911-04 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – In Loving Memory of Catherine Helen, 1978
Ph0911-05 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - showing chequered tile floor and iron fence surrounding the monument - for w e
Ph0911-05 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – showing chequered tile floor and iron fence surrounding the monument

 

Ph0911-06 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Front of monument showing memorial to J H Monger and Henrietta Joaquina Monger, 1892 and 1894 - for w e
Ph0911-06 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Front of monument showing memorial to J H Monger and Henrietta Joaquina Monger, 1892 and 1894

 

Ph0911-07 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Angel and pedestal atop the memorial - for w e
Ph0911-07 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Angel and pedestal atop the memorial

 

Ph0911-08 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Angel and pedestal atop the memorial (Close-up) - for w e
Ph0911-08 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Angel and pedestal atop the memorial (Close-up)
Ph0911-09 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Close-up of memorial plaque for JH Monger and Henrietta Joaquina 1892 and 1894 - for w e
Ph0911-09 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Close-up of memorial plaque for JH Monger and Henrietta Joaquina 1892 and 1894.

 

Ph0911-10 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Front of monument looking face on with cloudy sky behind - for w e
Ph0911-10 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Front of monument looking face on with cloudy sky behind

 

Ph0911-11 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Front of monument from an angle with cloudy sky behind - for w e
Ph0911-11 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Front of monument from an angle with cloudy sky behind

 

Ph0911-12 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Believed to be stone covering entrance to mausoleum area - for w e
Ph0911-12 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Believed to be stone covering entrance to mausoleum area.

 

Ph0911-13 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - In Loving Memory of Rupert Monger 1973 - for w e
Ph0911-13 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – In Loving Memory of Rupert Monger 1973

 

Ph0911-14 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Angel and pedestal atop the memorial (Close-up of angel's left side) - for w e
Ph0911-14 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Angel and pedestal atop the memorial (Close-up of angel’s left side)

 

Ph0911-15 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - Covedred entrance to mausoleum and iron lace fence surrounding the monument - for w e
Ph0911-15 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – Covered entrance to mausoleum and iron lace fence surrounding the monument.

 

Ph0911-16 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - In sun shine - for w e
Ph0911-16 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – In sunshine

 

Ph0911-17 Grave of John Henry Monger - EPC - In sun shine - for w e
Ph0911-17 Grave of John Henry Monger – EPC – In sunshine

Floreat Park No. 5 Estate – The Centre for Your Home

Here is the subdivision plan for Floreat Park No. 5 Estate, now added to Cambridge Notes. This subdivision was, auctioned on site on Saturday 3rd December, 1938 at 3pm by McLean, Carmichael Ltd Auctioneers (89 St Georges Terrace, Perth) for the Perth City Council.

Floreat Park No. 5 - Subdivision Plan
Floreat Park No. 5 – Subdivision Plan

 

Over the coming weeks we will be adding more subdivision plans to our Local History online database known as Cambridge Notes.

 

Check out Cambridge Notes and all the historic gems it contains here: https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/

Floreat Park No. 4 Estate

Here is the subdivision plan for Floreat Park No. 4 Estate, now added to Cambridge Notes. This estate was auctioned on site on Saturday 11th December 1937 at 3pm by Peet & Co. Ltd Auctioneers, by Authority of the Perth City Council. Pencil markings next to lot numbers in the list of “Upset prices and Areas” believed to be the prices in pounds that were paid for the lots.

Floreat Park No. 4 [Subdivision Plan]
Floreat Park No. 4 [Subdivision Plan]

Over the coming weeks we will be adding more subdivision plans to our Local History online database known as Cambridge Notes.

Check out Cambridge Notes and all the historic gems it contains here: https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/

Letter from a Soldier to his Sister – Private David John Simcock to his sister Martha

Letter from David to his sister, Courtesy of Amber Simcoe
Letter from David to his sister, Courtesy of Amber Simcoe

 

Transcription of Letter

“Sep 14th, 1914

Dear Martha and Arthur

I am just writing you a few lines to let you know I am going to the war and will leave on the 16th of Sep. Nell, Doris & Norma are all well. Mum, Fred and Elsie Ted (?) is over at Rottenest Island with the soldiers & guarding the German soldiers so mum has got both of us doing something for the country sake [sic]. Well Mat I hope I get back safe but I hope & trust I do but if I have the bad luck to get shot it is all in the fun[,] if I stop behind I might get run over with a motor car you never know your luck in a big city [.] Our days are all numbered so cheer up we have got a fine body of men going to the front [,] strong health good living and pleasant [to see?] W. if boys want to make a name for ourselves. I hope Arthur & yourself are in the best of health and by the time I get back if I am spared I hope you will have a sample of the rising generation[.] I think this is all.

Good Bye and May God Bless and Keep you.

I remain your loving brother

Dave xxx”

 

Lest We Forget

COMING SOON to Cambridge Notes – Floreat Park Subdivision Plans

We are currently undergoing a digitisation project with the aim of making as much of our collection accessible online as possible. This project is a long term one, so be patient with us as we uncover some gems of history for you to enjoy…

This week a tantalising look at one of the early subdivision plans of Floreat Park, specifically Floreat Park No. 3.

Floreat Park No. 3 [Subdivision Plan]
Floreat Park No. 3 [Subdivision Plan]
Over the coming weeks we will be adding this and more subdivision plans to our Local History online database known as Cambridge Notes.

Check out Cambridge Notes and all the historic gems it contains here: https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/

 

“We didn’t have two sixpences to rub together” – John Bull – Track 3 of A Cambridge Romance

A Cambridge Romance Cover Image - Track 3 - John Bull
A Cambridge Romance Cover Image – Track 3 – John Bull

 

We have a fabulous collection of oral history interviews here at Cambridge Library, and they are all available for loan.

 

The interviews cover many topics, such as sport, transport, life in the area during the war years, cooking, games, employment, women, families, humourous stories, The Old Plank Road, shopping, the 1962 Empire and Commonwealth Games, and much more.

 

From time to time we also make compilations from our interviews based on various topics. Just recently, for example, we completed a special compilation to commemorate a century since the Old Plank Road was opened in 1918, and we are currently planning a special compilation around the Homefront of World Wars I and II.

 

Today we are highlighting our special compilation made in honour of Library Lovers’ Day in 2014 – A Cambridge Romance. This is a special compilation that tells of the romantic meetings, engagements, weddings and anniversaries of couples from within the Town of Cambridge who have been interviewed over the years.

 

The whole compilation is available for loan from Cambridge Library: http://cambridgelibrary.worldcat.org/oclc/935097437

 

In 2004 Wilma Mann interviewed John and Enid Bull for the Oral History Collection, and Wilma asked John how he and Enid met.

 

Listen to the audio by clicking this link which will take you to Cambridge Voices and “We didn’t have two sixpences to rub together” – Track 3: John Bull:  https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/textcoll/id/133/rec/17

 

Keep this page open and scroll down for the Transcription of the interview.

 

TRANSCRIPT

Transcript - Track 3 - Cover page

Transcript - Track 3 - page 2 - Copyright

 

Transcript - Track 3 - p3

Transcript - Track 3 - p4

If you liked this excerpt from A Cambridge Romance, be sure to borrow the compilation from Cambridge Library. You can also stay tuned for the next instalment that will appear here on Follow the Old Plank Road.

Cambridge Remembers – Private James William Bowen

Bowen, James William
Lest We Forget – Private James William Bowen (Service Number: 3159)

 

Deaths. Killed in Action. James William Bowen - Kalgoorlie Miner, 29.10.1917, p.4

 

Im Memoriam - James William Bowen, Kalgoorlie Miner, 30-9-1918 p. 4

 

 

Discover the stories of our brave men and women from the area within the Town of Cambridge throughout the years by following the link below.

“Cambridge Remembers” a collection within our Cambridge Notes database that honours our heroes and heroines:

https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p20029coll5

 

 

The Ode

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them (1).

 

References:

 

  1. Binyon, Laurence 1914, ‘The Ode’, [from] For the Fallen, The Times [London, England], 21st September 1914.
  2. Image of Private James William Bowen Courtesy of Carolyn Johnson and Faithe Jones.
  3. Attestation Papers of Private James William Bowen Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia:   https://recordsearch.naa.gov.au/SearchNRetrieve/Interface/ViewImage.aspx?B=3102668
  4. 1918 ‘Family Notices’, Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 – 1950), 30 September, p. 4. , viewed 07 Feb 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article92746338
  5. 1917 ‘Family Notices’, Kalgoorlie Miner (WA : 1895 – 1950), 29 October, p. 4. , viewed 07 Feb 2019, http://nla.gov.au/nla.news-article92179964

Cambridge Remembers – Harold Reginald Carter

Lest We Forget - Harold Reginald Carter (1549)
Lest We Forget – Harold Reginald Carter (Service Number: 1549)

 

Discover the stories of our brave men and women from the area within the Town of Cambridge throughout the years by following the link below.

“Cambridge Remembers” a collection within our Cambridge Notes database that honours our heroes and heroines:

https://cambridgelocalstudies.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p20029coll5

 

The Ode

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:

Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn

At the going down of the sun and in the morning

We will remember them (1).

 

 

References:

 

  1. Binyon, Laurence 1914, ‘The Ode’, [from] For the Fallen, The Times [London, England], 21st September 1914.
  2. Image of Pte Harold Reginald Carter Courtesy Australia’s Fighting Sons of the Empire, p. 92.
  3. Attestation Papers of Pte Harold Reginald Carter Courtesy of the National Archives of Australia